Anterior Cruciate Ligament


The ACL is one of the four main ligaments in the knee joint that connect it to the shinbone (tibia) and thighbone (femur). It’s located deep within the joint, behind the kneecap (patella), above the shinbone, and below the thighbone. The ACL works with the PCL (posterior cruciate ligament), which crosses over it to form an “X.” Together, these two ligaments help keep the knee stable when rotating. The ACL keeps the shinbone in place and prevents it from moving too far forward and away from the knee and thighbone. Anterior cruciate ligament injury Anterior cruciate ligament injury occurs when the Read More …

Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement


The minimally invasive knee replacement procedure is same as a traditional knee replacement. The traditional knee replacement requires around 6 to 8 inches long incision. The patient size and the extent of the joint damage can sometimes determine the length of the incision. The cut allows the surgeon to fully visualize the joint, the diseased tissues, and the implants. Minimally invasive total knee replacement may also require a 3 to 4-inch incision, without cutting through the quadriceps tendons and muscles. Half the length of a traditional knee replacement incision. The surgeon can perform surgery through such a short incision because Read More …